Unseen Beacons – Photography by Matt Botwood

LOCATION: Brecon Beacons, Wales

WORDS & PHOTOGRAPHS: Matt Botwood

In this ongoing project I am trying to capture views of the Brecon Beacons that are edited out of most landscape imagery, and show more of the everyday life that goes on in the National Park and some of its history.  Click here to see more of this collection.

Ghost Town, Penwyllt
Ghost Town, Penwyllt
carcrashsmaller1
Blaen Dyar, Clydach

 

Disused Tunnel, Cwar yr Hendre
Disused Tunnel, Cwar yr Hendre
Limestone Quarry, Penderyn
Limestone Quarry, Penderyn

 

Vampire VZ106, Waun Haffes
Vampire VZ106, Waun Haffes
Abandonned Armchair, A4059
Abandoned Armchair, A4059

Self Portrait in Woods, Ystradfellte, Brecon Beacons, Wales, UKABOUT THE PHOTOGRAPHER:

Matt Botwood is a photographer based in the Brecon Beacons specialising in images made in the landscape around him. A keen hillwalker, he is less likely to be found capturing grand sunset vistas and more interested in looking for details and abstracts in the landscape in places less likely to be frequented by casual visitors. Follow Matt on twitter (@mattbotwood) and facebook. You can see the completed image series on his website here.

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