The Humanoid Landscape – Whitstable and the gog/magog labyrinth

HumanoidLOCATION: Whitstable

WORDS: Gary Budden 

‘An old lady up the street told me there was a dead giant laying in the forest’

The oddest entry I’ve come across in the nebulous genre of landscape writing/psychogeography/white blokes walking around taking notes, has to be The Humanoid Landscape by astrologer, ex-environmental campaigner and Whitstable native Fen Lander.

His website declares: ‘After 6 years living in a garden shed, the oakman Fen Lander emerges with his new book The Humanoid Landscape, “A sensation for the totaly [sic] out of this world” which will surely excite the fervent mind.’

The blurb explains it better than I could:

Fen Lander has uncovered something strange – weird even – within the landscape of the Isles Of The Gods, that is, the British Isles . . .

A massive winged, horned, be-tailed cherub, angel, humanoid, that no one sees or has seen for two thousand years. According to the author, the name of every settlement, hamlet, village, town and city in England and Wales can be – is meant to be – read like a physiological diagram.

I don’t really understand what this book is about, but it made me very happy to discover such eccentricity in the town I grew up in, and that Whitstable could provide the key for someone to decipher the gog/magog labyrinth that had obviously been bugging them.

Fen expounds on a lot of the ideas of his theory here:

Fen’s New Earth Press website can be found here

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Gary Budden is co-founder of independent publisher Influx Press and assistant fiction editor at Ambit magazine. He lives in London. You can read more by Gary on his blog, New Lexicons.

More Articles for You

White Tents in the Car Park: A Covid 19 Despatch from Kent

Emilia Ong on the chilling vision of a Covid testing centre in a Margate car park

From Neolithic Roundabouts & Satanic Car Parks to Council Estate Poltergeists – The Weird Lore of Everyday Urban Places

In this video presentation, Gareth E. Rees takes you on a visual journey through the unexpected places he visits in his book, ‘Unofficial Britain’

The Eerie Tale of the Zombie Junction Behind Sainsbury’s Car Park

On an ill-fated supermarket car park walk during the pandemic, Gareth E. Rees ends up stalking the undead beside an abandoned roundabout

The Banshee and the Roundabout: Bizarre stories & folklore today

Irish storyteller Helena Byrne, place writer Marcel Krueger & Gareth E. Rees discuss the importance of folklore, bizarre stories and urban myths in the contemporary world

Nothing With Nothing: A Lonely Drift Down Marine Drive, Margate

Emilia Ong’s meditation on alienation and strangeness on a walk by the amusement arcades of a British seaside town

Ghostspaces Where the Bombs Once Fell

To celebrate Halloween, Deeana Violet tells the tale of the ghosts which filled the spaces created by Blitz devastation in Sheffield