From Neolithic Roundabouts & Satanic Car Parks to Council Estate Poltergeists – The Weird Lore of Everyday Urban Places

In this video presentation, Gareth E. Rees takes you on a visual journey through the unexpected places he visits in his book, ‘Unofficial Britain’

Gareth E. Rees is author of ‘Unofficial Britain: Journeys Through Unexpected Places‘ (Elliot & Thompson). In this presentation, hosted by October Books on 19th November 2020, Gareth talked about his emotional relationship with a factory chimney…. the phenomenon of council estate poltergeists…. his hunt for cryptobeasts lurking in Scotland’s industrial edgelands… Neolithic roundabouts in retail parks…. satanic messages in haunted multi-storey car parks… ritualistic folk offerings in underpasses… and the mysterious Concrete Henge of the M6.

October Books is a co-operative, radical neighbourhood bookshop and community hub in Southampton. Find out more about the shop here.

You can buy ‘Unofficial Britain’ now from local bookshops or on Amazon, Hive, Waterstones or Bookshop.org https://uk.bookshop.org/books/unoffic…

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